“The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance” Netflix Review

Since I will be at Halloween Horror Nights Orlando all weekend, my review of It: Chapter 2 will be delayed. So while you wait, checkout this review of Netflix’ The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance that I did with the Netflix ‘n Swill podcast. Dan and Caleb were so much fun to talk with, and if you like Netflix shows or movies in general, then you should give them a follow.

Netflix newest epic fantasy series is a hit! If Netflix was searching for its Game of Thrones, it may have found it in The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance. While we haven’t been given word if a second season has been greenlit, it would not surprise me if we learn that news in the near future. From the outstanding production design to the spectacular puppets and sweeping score, this is one to watch if you love fantasies. I love it when I can see the hand of the artist in the motion picture, and this show is overflowing with the art of storytelling. To be honest, the first episode is a little convoluted with world building, and was difficult to follow at points, but the episodes thereafter successfully develop the central characters and the lore of the crystal. For longtime fans of the original, you may notice some of the lore doesn’t quite match up, but it’s not completely off either. I imagine some of it is modified in order to write a whole TV series as opposed to a feature film. None of the differences take me out of the story, but it is something for which to look. You’ll find that the writing is gripping and points to the events of the cult classic while delivering a new story in a familiar world. This new series is completely connected to the original, and feels that it is truly doing the original justice in this age that predated the “age of wonder” that the original film takes place in.

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Ryan teaches screenwriting at the University of Tampa and teaches high school TV/Film production. If you like this article, check out the others and FOLLOW this blog! Interested in Ryan making a guest appearance on your podcast or contributing to your website? Send him a DM on Twitter or email him at RLTerry1@gmail.com!

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“Stranger Things” Season Three TV Review

StrangerThings3_tallNetflix’s Stranger Things Season Three represents a return to form! Much like Apocalypse did for American Horror Story, this season of Stranger Things took what worked in Season One and delivered an outstanding third season that has–what could possibly be–my favorite scene in the entire series. Even more than the previous two seasons, this one takes 80s culture and style to the max, complete with a nostalgic shopping mall and carnival. More so than any of the previous seasons, this one is the most roller coater yet. More monsters, more conflict, more horror. It’s also only eight episodes; and to that point, this season is tight, precise, and never leaves you in a lull. Whether you were a kid or teenager in the 80s or not, this season does what Stranger Things does best–connect you with your childhood. Whereas the series has been more science-fiction than horror in the previous two seasons, season three skews much closer to horror giving audiences some nightmarish imagery that echoes sci-fi horror staples such as Invasion of the Body SnatchersThe Blob, and The Thing.

Instead of playing on the mystery or fear of the unknown, season three is aware that the spider-like mind flayer and demogorgon aren’t as scary as they were in the first two seasons. So it delivers a new character of opposition that is terrifying in both mind and body. This parallels the changes that the central characters are going through during this time of encroaching upon adolescence. The boys have deeper voices and the hormones are raging. In addition to navigating the horrors that are befalling Hawkins, our central characters are forced to navigate relationships, sexuality, growing up, and loss. And this exploration of relationships is not limited to the kids, but the adults of Hawkins find themselves forced to face true feelings as well. It’s the added intellectual dimension of the human condition that makes this such a strong season for me. In fact, the more I think about it, the more that this might just be my favorite season, with Season One being a close second. What makes some of the greatest horror films of all time stick with us is the social commentary and thematic depth. Stranger Things season three dives deep by consistently keeping the focus on the character conflict and not simply the other-worldly entities.

One of the most relatable avenues through which to connect with characters is the avenue of relationship dynamics. And there are a plethora of relationships on display in this season. Early on, we have the incessant making out of El and Mike, the sexually frustrated relationship between Joyce Byers and Hopper, the friendship of Steve and Robin, later on we have the breaking up of El and Mike, followed by the blooming friendship between Max and El. We witness the strained relationship between Will and his childhood guy friends as his friends begin dating and leave him to play D&D alone. Then there is the seemingly made-up girlfriend of Dustin’s that he cannot connect with via his powerful  radio. Add a coming-out story to this mix, and we have many different personal and interpersonal relationship dynamics with which to connect. Relationships provide conflict, and that conflict directly impacts the drama. And we have lots of drama this season. Each of the aforementioned relationships provides the means for the characters to experience his or her own arc and grow positively or negatively. On a lighter note, there is an uplifting message of embracing your inner nerd that is evident in the drama that unfolds between Dustin, Robin, Steve, and Erica at the ice cream shop; and further evidence for this message is in my favorite scene in the entire series, The Neverending Story theme song singalong between Dustin and Suzzie. It doesn’t get much nerdier than that.

Skewing closer to horror than science-fiction, season three’s monster is right out of The Blob. There are also elements of Invasion of the Body Snatchers and The Thing. I absolutely love the idea of this monster because attacks its victims in two different ways (1) the blob will absorb the bodies of the victims and (2) the mindflayer takes control of the minds and bodies of those it deems are worthy vessels. There is a two-fold nature to this monster that makes it more terrifying than the previous iterations, because it attacks the mind and body. Much like William Friedkin’s The Exorcist took the home invasion horror concept to the next level by a demon invading the house and bodily home of an innocent little girl, the mindflayer, in a similar fashion, takes on many of the characteristics of the demon Pazuzu in Friedkin’s horror masterpiece. Characteristics of the alien entity in The Thing are also included in the actions of the mindflayer, specifically how it takes host of a body and can remain undetected. It’s this multidimensional component in the design of the monster that makes it the most terrifying creature we have encountered in Hawkins, IN.

So much fun! Season three of Stranger Things provides us with a fantastic character-driven plot that deviates from the action-driven plot in season two by returning to form. By the Duffer Brothers going back to what made the first season such a hit, this third season keeps the show going strong. Furthermore, the story is a lot tighter in this shortened season. Just goes to show that even when you have fewer episodes, the quality of the show doesn’t have to suffer. In this case, the quality went up from the previous season. Everything in this season works so very well, from the tight screenwriting to the nostalgic production design. After a mediocre second season, I was anticipating much the same for the tertiary season. Thankfully I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed season three, and feel confident that you will too!

You can catch Ryan most weeks at Studio Movie Grill Tampa, so if you’re in the area, let him know and you can join him at the cinema.

Ryan teaches screenwriting at the University of Tampa. If you like this article, check out the others and FOLLOW this blog! Interested in Ryan making a guest appearance on your podcast or contributing to your website? Send him a DM on Twitter!

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“The Dark Crystal” Throwback Thursday Review

With the highly anticipated The Dark Crystal: Age of Resistance releasing on August 30th, I want to revisit the cult classic that is still equal parts beautiful and terrifying to this day. A couple of years ago, Fathom Events brought The Dark Crystal to the big screen, so I was able to watch this outstanding motion picture on the big screen for the first time ever. Despite the very macabre nature of many parts of the movie, my parents showed this movie to my sister and I at a young age. From the very first time we watched it, my sister and I became fans. As kids–back when kids played outside, in the woods, and in abandoned buildings using their imaginations to role play–we created characters that were ostensibly taken from the world of the movie, and spent hours imagining we were in Thra. As a kid, I was mesmerized by the spectacular production design and puppetry. I can only speculate the degree to which kid-me appreciated the artistic elements of the now iconic motion picture, but I imagine that it completely captured my imagination, otherwise I would not have rewatched it as many times as I did. As an adult, I am shocked that my parents allowed me to watch it at such a young age because there are moments that terrify first-time adult audiences today. Sometime last year, I introduced this movie to my penpal, and he was blown away by how dark this fantasy movie was. Of course, this movie came out at a time that fantasies were dark (case and point, The Neverending Story). On the surface, this may be a common premise of good triumphing over evil despite adversity, but there is so much more that makes this the timeless classic that it is. Jim Henson was an incredible genius who truly knew how to combine form with function to create a fantastical masterpiece.

What stands out more than the plot itself (which is pretty straight forward), is the fantastical practical effects that give the film incredible depth–levels of dimension that CGI-heavy movies with they had but won’t ever achieve. Why? Simply because you cannot replicate the way real light bounces off real objects and into the camera lens. The atmosphere that the setting and characters combine to make is a level of movie magic that only the genius of Jim Henson could have created. Frank Oz stated that children should not be sheltered from darkness because it is just as much a part of their lives as joy and laughter. There are some truly terrifying and sad moments in this movie. And it looks as if this sentiment is going to be channeled into the new series. The story does not shy away from topics such as torture, death, gender roles, independence, and courage. Whereas the plot itself is simple, the characters are highly complex. Moreover, each of the Skeksis represents one of the seven deadly sins, and each Mystic is the good counterpart. The gelflings represent the “human” or emotional component in the narrative, so they serve as the conduit through which we experience the plot. Aughra is our logical character whom provides the diegetic exposition to understand the gravity of the encroaching Great Conjunction. There is a beautiful poetry in how the characters all complement one another and their respective surroundings.

Although all Jim Henson movies feature muppets (Henson’s patented puppets) and other movies have puppetry, The Dark Crystal stands alone as the only film of his that is entirely puppets! Yes, you could argue that the few longshots are human actors, but that is splitting hairs. For all intents and purposes, only puppets appear in this movie. And these puppets were the most advanced to ever hit the screen, and still the most advanced puppets to have ever been witnessed on the silver screen. Fewer than 20yrs after The Dark Crystal, virtually all puppetry would be replaced with CGI to save money and time. Sacrificing experiential art for technical marvel and efficiency. These advanced puppets inspired the ones that have made appearances in Disney and Universal parks over the years. Some of the puppets had to be operated by multiple people, yet when you watch them on screen, you forget that they are a puppet because they truly exist within the fantastical world. I love how the design of each and every kind of puppet is an extension of the world in which they live. So much dimension in each and every creature. There are lines, shadows, textures, and more that CGI could never replicate. These are three-dimensional creatures that exist within a four-dimensional world that exemplify the absolutely peak of a combination of technical design, costuming, and articulated performance that the camera natively captures without need for post-production to create a significant effect after the fact. Very seldom do we get to witness such an attention to detail in the design of a character (we will get to the set soon). These puppet characters do not feel or look artificial, the manner in which the light reflects off them and they interact with the world around them gives them an outstanding ability to make us forget that there is someone pulling the strings. We emotionally connect with these characters in such a way that can so often only be done with human or animal actors.

The production design of the set is an outstanding, dazzling artistic achievement by standards then and now. You’ll be hard pressed to find another set that is created with such a high degree of tangible detail. No amount or quality of CGI can even hold a candle to the wildlife, plant life, and landscape of Thra. I absolutely love how the homes of each of the groups of characters (Skeksis, Mystics, Podlings, Gelflings, and everyone’s favorite Aughra), are designed to be an extension of the inhabitants themselves. Because there is nothing generic about any of the settings, the degree to which the lands feel real is astonishing. One of the reasons for that is because it IS real! Blue/green screen technology was still in its infancy so there was thankfully no real desire to integrate it into the set for most of the movie. However, the final scene of the movie does feature some green screen work that does not hold up today. Without a screen able to fill in the gaps for most of the movie, the artisans and craftsmen had the daunting task of bringing this world of fantasy in the age of wonder to life. And their tireless efforts pay off in spades. Diversity runs strong all through the story both visually and figuratively. No two landscapes or settings look alike, just as no two characters (even the podlings) look identical. Every line, corner, and texture radiates art. More than simply a backdrop for the scenes of the plot, the settings are essentially characters themselves. The way the characters interact with their surroundings holds the audience in an incredible suspension of disbelief as to the believability of the world that is on screen.

Although it was not a blockbuster in the US, as it was up against E.T. that same year, it was the highest grossing box office hit in France and Japan. Not being an initial box office success has not stopped the film from aging well and remaining an impressive work of art even by today’s audiences. Perhaps it is best known for being a cult classic, but that cult following has remained strong through the years. So much so that we have the Netflix prequel series with an all-star cast debuting in August. It’s refreshing to see that a prequel (or sequel) strives to embody the soul of the original in order to inspire a new generation of fans and future visual storytellers. We fell in love with the original because of the puppetry and production design, the unique characters, and fantastical elements that make it an exemplary motion picture.

You can catch Ryan most weeks at Studio Movie Grill Tampa, so if you’re in the area, let him know and you can join him at the cinema.

Ryan teaches screenwriting at the University of Tampa. If you like this article, check out the others and FOLLOW this blog! Interested in Ryan making a guest appearance on your podcast or contributing to your website? Send him a DM on Twitter!

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“Velvet Buzzsaw” One Movie Punch Review

The lowdown on high art.

The highly anticipated Netflix original satirical thriller Velvet Buzzsaw is now streaming. Go beyond the frame into the vicious word of the art business. Much like the hype surrounding Bird Box, this movie was also proceeded by a prolific number of memes on social media. Although this movie opened to mixed reviews from critics and audiences, I found it to be immensely enjoyable. Not to the point that it’s a great movie, but a solid thriller. A plot and setting that could have so easily been boring were intense and seductive. Who would have thought being a critic would be so alluring and perilous. Furthermore, this movie provides audiences with thought-provoking commentary on art and business. You witness all the players in the art business game: the creators, critics, clients, and curators. Essentially, the theme of this sexy, sinister, satire is the more we attribute a monetary value to art, that is inspired by a creator’s incredibly dark place, the more we run the risk of suffering, even vicariously, a deadly consequence for our selfish actions…

For the full review, visit the One Movie Punch website for the audio review and transcript! And if you don’t do so, follow One Movie Punch on Twitter and subscribe with your podcast service.

Ryan teaches screenwriting at the University of Tampa. If you like this article, check out the others and FOLLOW this blog! Interested in Ryan making a guest appearance on your podcast or contributing to your website? Send him a DM on Twitter!

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Twitter: RLTerry1

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Now Playing: Netflix at a Theatre Near You?

After pioneering the streaming service, is Netflix aiming to revolutionize the multiplex experience? Recently, the Twittersphere and blogosphere has been all abuzz regarding Netflix’ possible acquisition of multiplex cinemas. But what does that mean for the customer and for Netflix? Those questions have prompted me to explore the idea of a Netflix-owned chain of movie theatres. Who would’ve ever thought that the DVDs delivered-to-your-home distribution company would go on to essentially invent the streaming service concept, produce wildly popular original programming, would now possibly be in a position to own and operate multiplex cinemas. The irony here is that the company that tore down the brick-and-mortar walls of Blockbuster and whose system of delivering content put a huge dent into the bottom line of movie theatres would now look to build the walls it so effectively razed to the ground. Perhaps in how it completely demolished the legacy way of home video and original television content distribution for a more efficient system, it seeks to build a more cost-effective model of movie theatres to truly create a big screen experience for a Web2.0 universe.

But, is going back to the brick-and-mortar model going to be lucrative for the entertainment giant? After all, Netflix virtually has no conventional overhead, in terms of how it now delivers content; but the addition of brick-and-mortar movie theatres would significantly increase the overhead cost of its business model. Just because there will be an increase does not necessarily mean that’s this may be a bad move for the company. However, it does beg for exploration of the effects of a decision like this. It’s no secret that fewer people attend the cinema now than before streaming became so prevalent. According to the Bloomberg Report citing a statistic from Box Office Mojo, movie theatre ticket sales have hit a 25 year low. After a high in the early 2000s, the number of ticket sales has overall been on a moderately steep decline. Although the the initial drastic drop could be contributed the tremendous growth of home theatre surround sound DVD systems and some recession from the aftermath of 9/11, the remaining downward trend from 2010 to today can be attributed to Netflix, Hulu, and other streaming services. Furthermore, many TV channels began allowing subscribed users to watch current and recent content on demand over the last few years.

So, if the empirical data suggests that ticket sales will continue to fall, why would Netflix express a desire to throw its hat into the ring with established leaders AMC, Regal, and Cobb? Not to overly simplify it, but Netflix wants its chance at winning a Best Picture Oscar. In a recent interview with Vanity Fair, Steven Spielberg stated in that Netflix should compete for Emmys not Oscars. It wasn’t long after this interview that Netflix stated that it’s considering buying cinema multiplexes. In addition to Netflix making the headlines, Amazon Studios has quietly been making maneuvers that suggest that it may also be interested in buying a movie theatre chain. In order to mitigate the cost of going into the multiplex business, Netflix is not looking to build from scratch, but buy up the Landmark Cinemas that has been on the market for quite sometime now. Landmark is known for catering to arthouse films in much the same way Alamo Drafthouse does.

Ever since the landmark Paramount Decision in 1948, for reasons of violating anti-trust laws, movie studios (extending to distribution companies) are not permitted to own and operate chains of movie theatres. There are rare exceptions to this–Disney’s ownership of the historic El Capitan theatre across from TCL’s Grauman’s Chinese Theatre (the most famous movie palace in the world) being one of those. Since it’s not a chain and does run other company’s films, it is an exception to the ruling because it is a venue that anyone can rent, for the right price. Prior to the United States vs Paramount, it was customary for the studio to own and operate a chain of movie theatres that exclusively shows its movies. So, to see a Paramount movie, you’d have to go to a Paramount movie palace, for example. It was this gross lack of competition that violated anti-trust laws and led to the decision. With ticket sales slumping, large studios or distribution companies with deep pockets may find the best way to combat this is to own and operate theatres (that will have to be open to competition in order to remain within the confines of the law) that can be integrated into the branding, marketing, and promotion of a particular film.

A relationship between a studio and a movie theatre would allow for the production company or studio to forge a deeper relationship with the movie patron much in the same way Disney and Universal do with their theme parks. Not limited to Disney and Universal, Warner Pros, Paramount, Lionsgate, and DreamWorks have major theme park investments in Europe and Asia. The end result of owning a chain of movie theatres is the creation of an entire experience for the guest. For Netflix, this could mean premiering its successful series like Stranger Things, Black Mirror, and others at a movie theatre before it lands on the streaming service. Just like a homeowner can retrofit, remodel, and customize his or her home to benefit him, her, or the family, a movie studio could best custom design a completely immersive experience for the movie patron that creates an emotional connection that is sure to last and earn repeat business.

Aside from the cost and concept of creating a comprehensive experience for the movie patron, the standardization of start times and run dates should also be considered. Now, you can watch your Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime programming whenever and wherever you so desire. No boundaries. After all, Netflix tore down those movie theatre walls and TV schedules. Is there a great enough interest from the typical consumer to buy tickets on a specific day at a predetermined time to watch Netflix original programming? Further research needs to be conducted in order to assess whether or not there is sufficient interest. Anecdotally, one can easily assess that Netflix’ original TV series are more popular than the original movies. But what does the empirical data show? According to a report at the Exstreamist, “the average rating on a Netflix original movie is markedly lower than what one finds with Hollywood movies.” Using IMDb ratings (note: Amazon owns IMDb), Toledo looked at a number of 2017 movie and TV releases across a variety of genres. Suffice it to say, Netflix consistently hits homers when it comes to original TV programming–their record is rather impressive at 8.1; however, their movies are ranked considerably lower than the TV series at 5.9. It would appear that there is sufficient interest in Netflix’ original series but not strong enough interest in the movies. And movies would be far easier to arrange into a schedule at a theatre than a TV series. Films win Oscars, series win Emmys. So, Netflix would have to rely upon its original movies in the theatre. Therefore, the quality has to increase significantly. Read my article on Best Picture criteria HERE.

Certainly, Netflix has proven that it can revolutionize media consumption and blaze new trails. Therefore, if Netflix makes the decision to acquire a chain of movie theatres, then reason stands that it must have a solid plan for success. While the data may suggest that this could be a risky venture for the entertainment giant, perhaps interested parties like Netflix and Amazon Studios know how to reinvent the multiplex experience to emerge as leaders of content creation and distribution. Who will the new owner of Landmark Cinemas be in the future? Only time will tell. But, it looks as if a Netflix or Amazon owned movie theatre chain may be in the near future.